Kaci L. Nash
About Me

About Me

I am a historian and researcher, currently employed as a Research Associate in the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. I serve as the Project Manager and Researcher on the digital project, O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law & Family. I also work as an independent historian, conducting research, authoring essays and reports, and providing other administrative support for government agencies, scholars, and genealogists. I received a Master's Degree in History and a Certificate in Digital Humanities from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2012.

My research project at present revolves around updating and expanding my digital edition of the Civil War journal of Alcander Morse, a sergeant in the 37th Illinois.

Research

My research typically focuses on nineteenth-century America. More specifically, I enjoy investigating personal journeys, especially individualizing the experience of war, tracing family histories, and the process of Midwestern settlement.

The Civil War Journal of Alcander O. Morse

research, web design & development

The Long Struggle: Standing Bear & the Ponca

research

Anna: An Animated Historical Short

website design & development, research

O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law & Family

project management, research, transcription

"Places of Exchange: An Analysis of Human and Materiél Flows in Civil War Alexandria, Virginia"

research

"Emancipating the Bell Family: An Inquiry into the Strategies of Freedom-Making"

research

Curriculum Vitae

Education

Master of Arts, History, Certificate in Digital Humanities

August 2012 — University of Nebraska-Lincoln — Lincoln, Nebraska

Certificate of Achievement, Accelerated Legal Assistant Program

2007 — Metropolitan Community College — Omaha, Nebraska

  • Litigation Option
Bachelor of Arts, History with a Minor in Film Studies

May 2005 — University of Kansas — Lawrence, Kansas

  • Senior Thesis: "Beyond the Sphere: Revolutionary Women in Bleeding Kansas and the Civil War"
  • Study Abroad: British Summer Institute in the Humanities, 2004 — England, Scotland

Professional Experience

Research Associate — November 2014 - present
Center for Digital Research in the Humanities — University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Project Manager and Researcher — October 2012 - October 2014
William G. Thomas III — University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Project Manager — September 2013 - October 2014
Jeannette Jones — University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Independent Contracting

Researcher — July 2018 - present
Joe Starita — University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • current book project
Researcher — July - December 2015
Joe Starita — University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Researcher — May 2013 - November 2013
Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs — Lincoln, Nebraska

Research

Articles

"Emancipating the Bell Family: An Inquiry into the Strategies of Freedom-Making." In O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law & Family, edited by William G. Thomas III, et al. University of Nebraska-Lincoln

With William G. Thomas III and Robert Shepard. "Places of Exchange: An Analysis of Human and Materiél Flows in Civil War Alexandria, Virginia." Civil War History 62, no. 4 (December 2016) — Awarded the 2017 John T. Hubbell Prize

Books

The Long Struggle: Standing Bear and The Ponca. Lincoln: Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2016

Digital Scholarship

"With Unabated Fury: The Civil War Journal of Alcander O. Morse, 1862-1864" (2011-present)

"'On our way for the Sunny South, land of Chivalry': Northern Travelogues and the Southern Landscape" (May 2011) — Honorable Mention, George Edward Woodberry Prize, 2011, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Alternate Publications

Exhibit Text, "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Native American Art from the Permanent Collection," Great Plains Art Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, May 2015

Conference Papers

"Emancipating the Bell Family: An Inquiry into the Strategies of Freedom-Making," D.C. History Conference, Washington, D.C., November 2, 2018

"O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law & Family," electronic poster session, Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska, April 14, 2016

"Following Chief Standing Bear: Investigating the Ponca Removal Trail," Standing Bear and the Trail Ahead Symposium, Lincoln, Nebraska, May 15, 2015

"From Toronto to Grasshopper Falls: The Westering Impulse of the Codys to 1865," 1862-2012: The Making of the Great Plains Symposium, Lincoln, Nebraska, March 29, 2012

"Union Veterans and the Fight over Civil War Memory," Great Lakes History Conference, Grand Rapids, Michigan, October 9, 2010

Invited Presentations

"O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law & Family," project showcase, American Society for Legal History Pre-Conference Digital History Workshop, Toronto, Ontario, October 27, 2016

"Following Chief Standing Bear: Investigating the Ponca Removal Trail," Meeting of the Friends of Homestead National Monument, Beatrice, Nebraska, May 28, 2015

"Mapping the Chief Standing Bear Trail," Ponca Tribe of Nebraska Tribal Council Meeting, Lincoln, Nebraska, August 24, 2013

"Mapping the Chief Standing Bear Trail," Chief Standing Bear Trail Planning Committee Meeting, Omaha, Nebraska, August 2, 2013

Workshops

"Mapping Lab," Digital Humanities Bootcamp, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, April 9, 2015

"Mapping Lab," Digital Humanities Bootcamp, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, April 10, 2014

Awards & Honors

John T. Hubbell Prize, 2017, with William G. Thomas III and Robert Shepard, "Places of Exchange: An Analysis of Human and Materiél Flows in Civil War Alexandria, Virginia." Civil War History 62, no. 4 (December 2016)

Lowe R. & Mavis M. Folsom Distinguished Master's Thesis Award, 2013

Research Grant, 2011, Sheldon Fund, History Department Graduate Committee, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Scholarship, 2011, Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria, British Columbia

George Edward Woodberry Prize, Honorable Mention, 2011, Nineteenth Century Studies, Departments of History and English, "'On our way for the Sunny South, land of Chivalry': Northern Travelogues and the Southern Landscape," digital project

Skills and Expertise

  • Archival research
  • Transcription of nineteenth-century personal and legal documents
  • Document digitization
  • Advanced knowledge of Adobe Photoshop
  • Web design and encoding, including the following markup languages and styles: HTML, CSS, PHP, XML, TEI
  • Omeka and WordPress web publishing softwares
  • Subversion and Git version control systems
  • Text analysis tools: Voyant, TokenX
  • Mapping tools: Google Maps, CartoDB, StoryMapsJS, Esri Story Maps

Research Fields

Nineteenth-Century America, American Civil War, Family and Social History, New Military History, Digital History